CBS says '60 Minutes' exec Jeff Fager out for violating company policy

CBS ‘60 Minutes’ Executive Producer Jeff Fager to Depart

There are people who lost their jobs trying to harm me, and if you pass on these damaging claims without your own reporting to back them up, that will become a serious problem'.

The decision came amid multiple accusations of sexual harassment against Fager in The New Yorker in July and just days after the company's CEO and chairman, Les Moonves, departed over similar allegations.

In a statement to CBS News, Fager said his contract was terminated "for a harsh text I sent to a CBS employee".

The two-paragraph internal memo from CBS News president David Rhodes, which was seen by Reuters, said that Fager's departure "is not directly related to the allegations surfaced in press reports, which continue to be investigated independently".

He said Mr Fager had "violated company policy", without elaborating on how. "It was. I'll have more reporting on this tonight", she tweeted.

In the first New Yorker report, former colleagues also accused Mr Fager of inappropriate touching, and of protecting men accused of sexual misconduct.

Fager was named in reporter Ronan Farrow's recent piece centered on Les Moonves, former CBS Corp. chief executive. One former female senior producer told Farrow that Fager promoted another senior producer who had been physically abusive toward her, twisting her arm behind her back, and advised her to not go to human resources with her concerns. Fager has denied the claims. He acknowledged that his language in the text was "harsh", but said that "although journalists received harsh demands for fairness all the time, CBS didn't like it". She also claims that Fager told her to apologize to the other producer to "mitigate conflict in the office". "60 Minutes" is, as Rhodes notes in his memo, "the most significant news broadcast on television", having debuted in 1968 and served as the investigative home for such television inquisitors as Mike Wallace, Morley Safer, Ed Bradley and Lesley Stahl. "One such note should not result in termination after 36 years, but it did", Fager said.

"Despite Charlie's important journalistic contribution to our news division, there is absolutely nothing more important, in this or any organization, than ensuring a safe, professional workplace - a supportive environment where people feel they can do their best work", Rhodes said in a memo previous year. Rhodes was then brought in as news president, taking over full management of the news division when Fager went back to exclusively running "60 Minutes".

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