US President Trump arrives in Singapore for historic Trump-Kim summit

Kim Jong Un’s Bevy Of Bodyguards Are Back — And Yes, They’re Still Running

North Korean leader's Kim Jong Un was pictured with Singapore foreign minister Vivian Balakrishnan and education minister Ong Ye Kung on a night out just hours ahead of his scheduled meeting with President Donald Trump.

Trump has said he hopes to make a legacy-defining deal for the North to give up its nuclear weapons, though he has recently sought to minimize expectations, saying more than one meeting may be necessary.

By Toluse Olorunnipa and Jennifer JacobsPresident Donald Trump plans to shake hands and have lunch with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, kicking off a historic summit on Tuesday between two adversaries that only past year had seemed at the brink of nuclear war.

Nobody is pretending North Korea can ape Singapore but the message to Kim of the hermit kingdom is clear - come in from the cold on the steaming hot humid south Asian island of Singapore.

"President Trump believes that Kim Jong-un has an unprecedented opportunity to change the trajectory of our relationship and bring peace and prosperity to his country", added the secretary of state.

As Trump and Lee sat down for a working lunch at the Istana house, the president sounded optimistic, telling Lee, "We've got a very interesting meeting in particular tomorrow, and I think things can work out very nicely".

Kim told Lee: "The entire world is watching the historic summit between the DPRK and the United States of America, and thanks to your honest efforts. we were able to complete the preparation for the historic summit".

State media may have tried a dry run to handle Mr Kim's absence two weeks ago, when Central Television reported his opening of a new railway bridge in the east of the country while he was still in the coastal city of Wonsan inspecting the construction of a major holiday resort.

Last year it carried out by far its most powerful nuclear test to date and launched missiles capable of reaching the US mainland, sending tensions soaring to a level unseen in years as a newly-elected Trump traded threats of war and colorful personal insults with Kim, with Trump dubbed a "dotard" and Kim "Little Rocket Man".

Few people expect Kim to commit to what some Trump administration officials call "CVID:" Complete, verifiable, and irreversible dismantlement of nuclear weapons programs - certainly not at this meeting, and perhaps not ever. However, he took a U-turn soon and said the White House was proceeding with the preparations for the summit. He said the summit will lay the ground work for the "hard work" ahead.

"North Korea has previously confirmed to us its willingness to denuclearize, and we are eager to see if those words prove honest", Pompeo said.

Preliminary meetings have already begun.

Hours earlier, Kim had arrived in a jet and was received by Balakrishnan before heading to St Regis Hotel.

Tuesday's summit will be the first between a North Korean leader and a sitting American president.

Trump spoke only briefly in public, forecasting a "nice" outcome for the summit during a meeting with Singapore's prime minister.

North Koreans gathered outside a train station in the capital, Pyongyang, to watch news of the summit broadcast on a large screen. More recently, Trump has suggested he will raise human rights issues with Kim. Trump and Kim lookalikes held a summit of their own at a local shopping mall, while one bistro is offering a libation known as the Trump-Kim "Bromance:" Beer, tequila, diet Coke and the Korean distilled rice liquor known as soju.

"We don't know how developed North Korea's secure communications capabilities are, so whether Kim Jong Un will be within easy reach of his National Command Authority during his stay in Singapore is an open question", said Andrew O'Neil, a North Korea nuclear policy expert at Griffith University in Queensland, Australia.

Kim has been more cryptic and calculating, with his regime vacillating between welcoming talks with the USA, ignoring American overtures, and sharply attacking some of Trump's top officials with insults and threats, said Patrick Cronin, director of the Center for a New America Security's Asia-Pacific security program.

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