Army says soldier from Arizona killed in Somalia

US soldier killed and four wounded in Islamist terror attack in Somalia

Still, the US has made several changes in the way its forces have been operating in Africa, the result of an investigation into an October 2017 ambush of USA special operations forces in Niger that left four Americans and four Nigeriens dead.

US President Donald Trump sent his condolences in a tweet.

"My thoughts and prayers are with the families of our serviceman who was killed and his fellow servicemen who were wounded in Somolia".

One of the wounded U.S troops received medical care in the field while the other three and the wounded partner force member were medically evacuated to receive additional treatment.

Staff Sgt. Alexander W. Conrad, 26, of Chandler, had been supporting Operation Octave Shiel, a joint coalition effort by U.S., Kenyan and Somali soldiers to drive out the al Qaeda-affiliated group, al-Shabab, U.S. defense Department officials said Saturday.

The role of U.S. troops during the operation was to provide aerial surveillance and to provide other assistance to the coalition group.

He said the attack was in the southern town of Kismayo. His death was the first US military death in Somalia since 1993. The U.S. had pulled out of the Horn of Africa nation after 1993, when two helicopters were shot down in Mogadishu and bodies of Americans were dragged through the streets.

In West Africa, Special Operations forces are overseen by Army Special Forces, while the Naval Special Warfare Command, often known as the Navy SEALs, leads operations in Somalia. The al-Shabab group was blamed for the truck bombing in Mogadishu in October that killed more than 500 people and raised concerns about al-Shabab's ability to build ever-larger explosives.

Al-Shabab, linked to al-Qaida, seeks to establish an Islamic state in Somalia. The group was pushed out of the capital, Mogadishu, in 2011 but still controls some regions of the country.

Al Shabab has been fighting to overthrow the internationally backed government in Somalia since 2007.

But U.S. military officials said this week that no decision had been made. Earlier Friday, the U.S. Africa Command issued a statement in response to allegations that civilians had been killed in a May 9 operation, saying a "thorough review" found the allegations to be "not credible".

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