Flash flooding likely as Alberto brings heavy afternoon rain

Alberto will continue to lift north today bringing locally heavy rain and a low threat for tornadoes to east central Florida

"I strongly encourage everyone to be safe and stay informed", Mayor LaToya Cantrell said in a statement.

Tennant said the roots of the large tree tore loose from ground saturated by a week's worth of rain. One to four hurricanes could be "major" with sustained winds of at least 111 miles per hour (178 kph).(backslash)(backslash) If that forecast holds, it would make for a near-normal or above-normal season. But forecasters said flash flooding from heavy rain was the biggest risk in many areas.

Forecasters are also warning people in those same areas and in southern SC of the possibility that "brief tornadoes" could develop as Alberto moves further inland.

Alberto was more of a rainstorm than a wind threat, but the National Weather Service said at least one tornado had been confirmed. Its winds, which had strengthened overnight to 65 miles per hour, were down to 60 miles per hour as of 11 a.m.

"The main thing we would advise people is to not pay too much attention to the maximum winds", Zelinsky said. So, as Alberto moves inland and begins to weaken, don't assume the event is over.

The tree fell in Polk County not far from where a landslide killed a woman in her home on May 19 after heavy rains. And just as Memorial Day marked summer's unofficial start in the U.S., Alberto gave it the unofficial start of what forecasters recently predicted would be an active hurricane season.

The system is forecast to move across Alabama overnight and into the Tennessee Valley on Tuesday, then into the Ohio Valley and Great Lakes region on Wednesday and Thursday, according to the National Hurricane Center. It could deliver up to 6 inches of rain in some areas as it moves toward lower MI by Wednesday evening, officials said. More than an inch of rain has also already fallen in both Tallahassee and Apalachicola.

Mark Bowen, Bay County Emergency management director, said at a Sunday afternoon news conference that the concern isn't with storm surge due to the timing of landfall and the tides.

Forecasters said Alberto could bring risky high water to southern coastal states when it douses an area from MS to western Georgia with up to 30cm of rain and possible tornadoes.

Jeffrey Medlin, meteorologist in charge at the National Weather Service's Mobile office, warned that even after the storm passes there will still be swells that could cause unsafe rip currents.

Subtropical Storm Alberto has gained an early jump on the 2018 hurricane season, heading toward expected landfall sometime Monday on the northern Gulf Coast.

After Alberto reached 3.25 days as a named storm, Colorado State University meteorologist Philip Klotzbach said that it is "the longest-lived Atlantic named storm forming in May since Alice in 1953".

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