Soros Foundation moves from Budapest to Berlin

Hungarian army officers stand at the Serbian Hungarian border as a Syrian refugee women crosses near Roszke southern Hungary Saturday Sept. 12 2015

"It has become impossible to protect the security of our operations and our staff in Hungary from arbitrary government interference", said Patrick Gaspard, OSF president in Tuesday's statement.

The document also specified that the move is a necessary reaction to the actions of Prime Minister Orban, directed against non-governmental organizations.

The latest proposed legislation on nongovernmental organizations follows the passage of a 2017 law that imposed burdensome reporting requirements on Hungarian human rights and civil society groups receiving funding from overseas.

The proposals include a special tax on such NGOs, secret service surveillance of their staff, and a ban on any individuals deemed to be involved in "illegal immigration" from Hungary and its border zones.

"We need a tighter proposal than the one now in front of parliament", Antal Rogan, minister for Prime Minister Viktor Orban's cabinet office, said of the package, a major bone of contention between Hungary and the West.

Orban and Soros have clashed over the 2015 European migration crisis.

Open Society Foundations, the George Soros backed organization that has helped create the economic migrant crisis in Europe, is leaving the Central European nation of Hungary, declaring it can not "protect its employees from government".

George Soros' Open Society Foundations operates more than 40 offices around the world.

"The so-called Stop Soros package of laws is only the latest in a series of such attempts".

The Open Society Foundation (OSF) backed by Hungarian-born USA billionaire George Soros is moving from Budapest to Berlin, the German public broadcaster DW reported on Tuesday.

The campaign was criticized in the Hungarian Jewish community as having anti-Semitic overtones.

A Hungarian government billboard featuring George Soros, with the words translated to "Don't let George Soros have the last laugh" is seen at a transit stop in Budapest on July 6, 2017.

The prestigious Soros-founded Central European University is also waging a battle against Orban after a higher education law was passed previous year that it says threatens its survival in Hungary.

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