Britain Considers Military Action Against Syria

Syrian tanks assemble on the outskirts of Douma on Sunday in an operation to retake Eastern Ghouta

Russian Federation has warned the West against attacking its Syrian ally President Bashar al-Assad, who is also supported by Iran, and says there is no evidence of a chemical attack in the Syrian town of Douma near Damascus.

"We call upon. members of the worldwide community to seriously consider the possible consequences of such accusations, threats and especially action (against Syria)", Russian foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said.

Macron said Thursday that France has proof that the Syrian government launched chlorine gas attacks and said France would not tolerate "regimes that think everything is permitted".

Trump has slammed Russian Federation for its partnership with "Gas Killing Animal" Assad, spurring concerns that a USA strike could lead to a conflagration with Russian Federation, which has major military facilities at Tartus and Khmeimim and works cheek-by-jowl with Syria forces that could be targeted.

May told her senior ministers on Thursday that the attack in Douma showed a "deeply concerning" erosion of global legal norms barring the use of chemical weapons. But on Thursday, Trump tweeted: "Never said when an attack on Syria would take place".

Citing US estimates that Assad has used chemical weapons "at least 50 times" in the seven-year war, Haley said: "All nations and all people will be harmed if we allow Assad to normalize the use of chemical weapons". The sites reportedly include "two Syrian airfields, a research center and a chemical weapons facility".

The U.S., France and Britain have been consulting about launching a military strike.

SNP leader at Westminster Ian Blackford told the BBC: "There is no mandate for the Government to take this action".

The Syrian government denies responsibility. "We need to know where that's going, what the objective of it is before we take that act".

French President Emmanuel Macron claimed that the country had "proof" the Assad regime used chemical weapons in Douma and would support any U.S. action.

Asked about the risks of US military retaliation, Mattis cited two concerns, starting with avoiding civilian casualties.

The possibility of a military strike on Syria was discussed by the United States and its partners, particularly France and the United Kingdom, in the wake of reports on an alleged chemical weapons attack in the Syrian city of Duma.

Formally, the prime minister has the right to go to war without approval from parliament, but a convention has been established in previous conflicts where MPs have a vote either before or shortly after military action begins. May isn't legally required to do that, though it has become conventional since the 2003 invasion of Iraq for lawmakers to be given the chance to vote before British forces are deployed.

Britain has launched air strikes against Islamic State militants in Syria, but not against the country's government.

In Syria, French warplanes carried out 23 sorties in late March and early April but fired no strikes, as part of support for Syrian opposition forces fighting in the last pockets of IS control.

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