Queen Elizabeth Reportedly Fired Her Bra-Fitter for Revealing Royal Secrets

Queen Elizabeth II

The company which supplied lingerie to Queen Elizabeth II has lost its contract with Buckingham Palace after the owner published a book making references to the Royal family.

Kenton revealed how she carried out bra-fittings with the queen.

Her daughter, Jill Kenton, told the Mail: 'I'm so sad for my mum, as she actually wrote the book for her children and grandchildren. "I have never, ever spoken about what I do there with her, or the Queen Mother or Princess Margaret", she said.

The store front of Rigby & Peller in London.

She said she was told by the Palace six months ago that they "didn't like the book" and she shouldn't have the royal warrant any more. One of the most intimate reveals in the memoir is June's description of fitting the half-dressed Queen while the monarch was surrounded by her corgis.

However, Kenton did write about how she gave Princess Diana's sons, Prince William and Prince Harry, swimwear posters to put in their rooms during their time in school while supplying Diana with lingerie.

The 82-year-old stayed on the firm's board and continued to fit the Queen's bras at Buckingham Palace even when Belgian company, Van de Velde, bought her majority stake in 2011. "She's wonderful. I mean, don't you think she's incredible?"

Rigby & Peller, which had held the royal warrant since 1960, said it was "deeply saddened" to confirm it had been cancelled.

She insists her autobiography not a tell-all book, and said she even sent a copy to Buckingham Palace when the book was published past year.

'However, the company will continue to provide an exemplary and discreet service to its clients'. It's just upsetting at the end of my life, but what can I do.

'This is hard for me to say, but I don't want her to go with this, ' she said.

Buckingham Palace declined to comment.

Russel Tanguay, the director of royal warrants at the Royal Warrants Holders Association, confirmed to the Express that Rigby & Peller lost its royal warrant - i.e., its right to advertise itself as a royal supplier - in mid-2017.

But the BBC understood that Prince Philip was angered by allegations made by owner Mohamed al Fayed accusing the Duke of masterminding the 1997 auto crash in Paris that killed Diana, Princess of Wales and his son Dodi.

Mrs Kenton said losing the warrant "absolutely killed" her and that she regrets "not being wise enough" to omit mention of the royals in her autobiography.

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