Ibuprofen Was Just Linked to Male Infertility

Popping ibuprofen could make your balls shrivel

Luckily, in the test subjects the condition was mild, but the researchers said people should be concerned if they use anti-inflammatory drugs regularly over long periods of time.

Scientists warn that ibuprofen could be wrecking men's fertility by making their balls shrivel up.

The study, which took place in Denmark and France, involved 31 men under the age of 35.

Clinically, this condition is called "compensated hypogonadism"-"hypogonadism" because the body probably isn't producing testosterone at the appropriate rate, and "compensated" because other hormones have kicked in and gotten testosterone levels to increase.

Results showed that ibuprofen use led to an elevation of luteinizing hormone (LH) and a decreased testosterone/LH ratio, which is routinely used as a marker of testicular Leydig cell function.

Next, the researchers tested the direct effect of ibuprofen on testicles, using samples that had been taken from organ donors. The treatment group received 2 doses of ibuprofen 600mg daily for 2 weeks before and 30 days after a single exercise season.

This resulted in hypogonadism, which is associated with infertility and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases like stroke and heart failure. This rose to a 23% decrease after 44 days.

The drugs are considered "anti-androgenic", which means they lower the amount of hormones present in males. According to a recent study, however, regular consumption of the drug could lead to several side-effects, including male sterility.

'But the effects on the adult man remain largely unknown.

The new study isn't the first to suggest that ibuprofen has downsides. The higher and longer the level of exposure, the researchers found, the more dramatic the impact. So not only is the shrinking of your balls concerning on a personal level, it could also suggest you're going to die earlier.

Compensated hypogonadism is typically found in older men, and it is linked with impaired fertility, according to the study. Professional athletes, however, do tend to take ibuprofen frequently, so this research could spark a serious look into the way those under physical strain treat their aches and pains.

Before now, he says, "most warnings regarding this family of painkillers have focused on limiting long-term use in the elderly to prevent gastrointestinal, renal and cardiac adverse effects".

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