A virus mutation has made this year's flu vaccine less effective

Johns Hopkins researchers think they know how to fix the flu mist vaccine

More than 100 people have now been hospitalized this season with flu in Oklahoma, and, in the past week, the first two deaths from the illness in the state are reported. On Oct. 3, it was announced that Oxford University's Jenner Institute and Vaccitech, a biotech company, are developing a potential universal flu vaccine. "It may be a bad flu season, and in particular, in a bad season, you want to get every bit of protection you can".

The most advanced universal flu vaccine candidate is only in the earliest stages of human clinical trials, and others are still being tested in animals.

While the outlook for the US flu season is grim, Dr. Fauci maintained that Americans should still take the time to get a vaccination.

Doctors worry it could be be similar in the Uninted States. Note that the nasal spray flu vaccine is no longer recommended due to a lack of proven effectiveness for preventing influenza.

Also, experts suggest getting the flu shot.

Tis the season - the flu season. Viruses have a tendency to mutate over time, which makes the vaccine less effective.

"But this mutation we identified could be used to make that component of the vaccine a little stronger, thereby improving vaccine efficacy", Pekosz says.

Experts say 19 Oklahomans had to be hospitalized between November 22 and November 28 due to the flu. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk of serious flu complications.

MYTH 4: Everyone receives the same type of flu shot.

One rationale for the arduous flu season may be that this year's presently developed vaccine may have disparate to the flu drain may have wound up propagating creating the vaccinations unproductive at intercepting the outbreak. While still in development, the candidate vaccines would train the human immune system to recognize components of the virus that are common to all influenza strains and don't change from year to year as they crisscross the globe.

The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu.

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