Hate crimes overall climb 4.6 percent

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The FBI says hate crimes rose for the second straight year in 2016, with increases in attacks motivated by bias against blacks, Jews, Muslims and LGBT people.

Meanwhile, nearly one in five of last year's hate crimes were motivated by prejudices related to sexual orientation, 63 percent of them targeting gay men.

The FBI released its 2016 hate crime statistics report Monday.

Excluding a handful of "multiple bias" incidents, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said 57.5 percent of all incidents previous year were based on hate related to race, ethnicity or ancestry.

At the time, Cobb police said the higher number could be attributed to a computer system that lets officers designate an incident as a hate crime.

Minnesota's 2016 figures come from just 10 percent of participating agencies statewide. The agency collects its data from participating law enforcement officials through the Uniform Crime Reporting Program.

It is crucial to note, however, while this is the most comprehensive report of hate crimes, it is still incomplete. Hate incidents increased from 203 in 2015 to 285 in 2016. "Hate crimes demand priority attention due to their special impact".

"The Department of Justice is committed to ensuring that individuals can live without fear of being a victim of violent crime based on who they are, what they believe, or how they worship", Sessions said in a statement.

Incidents targeting Jews increased from 664 incidents in 2015 to 684 incidents in 2016.

Dozens of cities with more than 100,000 residents either reported zero hate crimes or did not submit their hate crime data, according toananalysis by the Anti-Defamation League, a civil rights organization, which has called for better reporting.

Of the 6,121 criminal incidents reported, 6,063 were single-bias incidents (there were also 58 multiple-bias incidents).

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