Chrome is making big changes to autoplay videos

Chrome Will Mute All Sites With Auto-Playing Sound by Default Starting 2018

In coming months, Chrome will only enable autoplay on websites when a piece of media either doesn't have sound, or when a user has indicated interest in a site via prior activity. In the upcoming version of the Google Chrome web browser (Chrome 64), Google will limit the ability for sites to autoplay videos, TechCrunch says.

The move has been made by Google in a bid to unify desktop and mobile web behaviour, adding more predictability across platforms and browsers.

Additionally, Google is introducing a new site muting option to Chrome 63 (which comes out in October).This option allows users to completely disable audio for individual sites.

In addition to the rules Google has about muted videos and the considerations it makes concerning previous media engagement, Google will also allow autoplay video through on sites users have added to their homepages.

The war of the browsers against the advertising has really begun: Apple is going to make obsolete a portion of the cookies as soon as September 2017, while Google, which develops the Chrome, has several new items in its drawers. While the content they offer can sometimes be useful, they can also be quite jarring when users aren't expecting them.

"These changes will give users greater control over media playing in their browser, while making it easier for publishers to implement autoplay where it benefits the user".

In a screenshot he shared, you can see that you'll be able to click "Info" or "Secure" label on the left of the URL you're visiting to access the feature. It's not so much the video, but the sound from the video that is truly aggravating.

Also this summer Google announced they would be continuing their crackdown against unwanted content by launching Google Chrome ad-blocking features in early 2018.

This includes things such as pop-up adverts and ads that expand on their own.

Do you applaud Google's forthcoming Chrome updates?

"For example, it prevents pop-ups in new tabs based on the fact that they are annoying".

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