Trump will tout tax reform at Springfield, Mo., company on Wednesday

Donald Trump FEMA

Tax reform legislation, if successful, would be Trump's first major legislative victory, and lawmakers have a window of only several months before their attention shifts to election campaigns, The Hill reported on Wednesday.

A Tennessee man who has followed the president to 33 states is selling pro-Donald Trump merchandise today in Springfield, as part of the president's visit there.

"Trickle-down economics didn't work in 2001 and 2003 and it won't work now", he said.

He spoke in broad strokes, saying that it was a "monumental thing that happened" when Ronald Reagan authorized lowering the corporate tax rate to 34 percent in 1986.

Tax reform efforts have been overshadowed by news about Hurricane Harvey, as well as Trump's controversies involving the pardon of former Maricopa County, Ariz., Sheriff Joe Arpaio, an alleged feud with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and comments about violence in Charlottesville, Va. But he said the president broke that promise by pushing for a bill that "guts healthcare for millions".

"This includes helping parents afford child care and the cost of raising a family", Trump said, adding that the issue was important to his daughter, Ivanka.

He will speak at the Loren Cook Company, which designs and produces fans and similar equipment, in Springfield, the so-called birthplace of Route 66, which the official said is emblematic of Main Street America.

"I don't want to be disappointed by Congress", Trump said in Springfield, Mo. "Do you understand me?"

"President Trump has challenged Congress to reduce the burden on the American worker and to build an economy that rewards honest work", Hawley wrote.

Trump made the pitch during a speech promoting his administration's tax agenda, which is still lacking in any significant detail. "We got it right here", says Taylor.

And after the Republican plan on healthcare stalled, he warned Congress not to let him down again.

Still, Mr. Trump's anticipated rhetoric about fixing a "system rigged for the wealthy and special interests" will risk giving ammo to his opponents, including Senate Democrats who vow to block any plan that provides new tax cuts to the top 1 percent of earners.

"For tax reform to be permanent it must be bipartisan, and to be serious it must abandon the exhausted myth that tax cuts pay for themselves", said Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), the minority whip.

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