Partial Lunar Eclipse Will Shadow the Moon on Monday

Science								Image Source Jorg Weingrill

Our moon may be 400 times smaller than the Sun, but it is also 400 times closer to Earth. Some of the picturesque places to see the full solar phenomenon are in Clayton, Toccoa and Black Rock Mountain State Park.

Those lucky people who can see it will witness a once in a lifetime opportunity as the Sun, the Moon and the Earth become perfectly aligned.

Only 20% of the moon will be under the shadow during the daytime. This results in Earth's shadow looking like it's about to "take a bite" out of the moon, instead of covering it completely.

These events are of only academic interest because they are subtle and hard to observe. So most months, at new moon, the moon is above or below the plane of the earths orbit and doesn't get directly in between the sun and the earth.

These events are easy to see, even with the unaided eye.

In addition to the eery twilight effect they cast over the earth, eclipses allow a rare glimpse at the sun's outer atmosphere, the corona - which is actually hotter than the surface of the sun.

These events are quite striking due to the Moon's vibrant red color during the total phase (totality).

You never want to look directly at the sun without appropriate protection except during totality.

You need the right protective glasses, such as those manufactured by Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, Thousand Oaks Optical or TSE 17. The partial eclipse will begin at 22:55 IST on August 7 and will last for about two hours, ending at 00:47 IST on August 8. A standard pair obinoculars work fine.

If you were up at 6.23am on Tuesday morning, and it isn't cloudy where you are, you would've got to see the peak of a partial lunar eclipse. The total duration of the eclipse is five hours, one minute. "And the next one will happen in about eight years". The next lunar eclipse will take place on 31st January and 27TH July in the year 2018.

"Every total solar eclipse brings with it a lunar eclipse either two weeks before or after", Slooh astronomer Paul Cox said in a statement.

Related news: