USA, Canada and Mexico announce joint bid to host tournament

Canada Mexico and the United States have officially announced a joint bid for the 2026 FIFA World Cup

The United States, Mexico and Canada have officially submitted a joint bid for the 2026 World Cup.

The CONCACAF countries confirmed their plan to bring the tournament to North America at a press conference at One World Trade Centre in NY.

The Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF) is the official organization behind the bid, that if successful, would host 48 nations for 80 World Cup matches in 2026 - 60 in the United States, 10 in Canada and 10 in Mexico. The United States, host nation in 1994, probably has the facilities and infrastructure to host a tournament on that scale by itself tomorrow.

"We have the full support of the United States government in this project", said the US Soccer president, Sunil Gulati, according to The Guardian.

"We are not at all concerned at some of the concerns that some people may raise", Gulati said.

The last time the USA held the quadrennial global football tournament was in 1994, with Mexico hosting twice, in 1970 and 1986.

Gulati said the US looked into making a solo bid - similar efforts to land the 2018 and 2022 World Cups failed - but he said he believed the proposal had a greater chance to be selected in coordination with Canada and Mexico.

Mexico hosted the 1970 and 1986 World Cups while the 1994 tournament was held in the US and remains the most highly attended World Cup ever.

"There has never been a World Cup where the host countries have not been qualified", Gulati said. So far no other countries have announced plans for a 2026 bid.

Fifa's executive committee is no longer responsible for the final say on which country is awarded a World Cup.

Federation Internationale de Football Association rules now prevent 2026 bidders from Europe and Asia because Russia is staging the World Cup in 2018 and Qatar has the showpiece in 2022.

Some reports have suggested that Morocco, which failed in bids for four previous World Cups, could team up with Spain and possibly Portugal in a joint bid. Brazil spent more than $11 billion to host the event in 2014, and Russian Federation is on pace to spend about $20 billion for 2018.

Sunil Gulati, President of the United States Soccer Federation has said in a presser that there is strong encouragement from Donald Trump and hence there are no concerns.

On that occasion, both nations were granted qualification to the tournament as hosts, as is tradition. But the bid, even now, nine years from the tournament, is considered a favorite since a hosts from South America, Europe, which have hosted recently, and Asia, which will host in 2022.

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