Google, an ad company, will soon block 'bad ads' in Chrome

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Chrome's widespread uptake by internet users means the browser has nearly half of the market when it comes to navigating the web, so putting an ad blocker natively within Chrome and turning it on by default would basically stop cold the growth of third-party options: Users won't actively seek out a way to block ads during their web-browsing sessions if the ads are already blocked to begin with.

Google is reportedly working on an ad blocker.

The WSJ is under the impression that Google is readying the feature and could have it ready within weeks, assuming they do launch it because they could still scrap it altogether. The Coalition for Better Ads, which counts Google and Facebook among its members, has a page of "least preferred ad experiences" up on its website. This could be seen as an attempt to coerce website operators to only run Google's AdSense ads, which are guaranteed not to run afoul of Google's blocking policies. The details aren't finalized yet, according to the sources, who say there's still a chance Google will choose not to release the feature. It would filter out only the ads Google deems unacceptable. Ad formats for the mobile Web, for example, fall "beneath the initial Better Ads Standard: pop-up ads, prestitial ads, ads with density greater than 30%, flashing animated ads, auto-play video ads with sound, poststitial ads with countdown, full-screen scrollover ads, and large sticky ads".

Google's blocked will filter out ads deemed unacceptable by the Coalition for Better Ads. Google wouldn't be aiming to eliminate advertising altogether, but a side-benefit for consumers might be the institution of more user-friendly acceptability standards for ads - if you turn off your ad blocker for a second, you'll find it's gotten pretty bad out there. The service, called Contributor, allowed Web site visitors to pay a monthly subscription fee to avoid seeing ads. Google already ostensibly bans many of these types of ads anyway. To beat the ad blockers, Google must become an ad blocker.

An expanded version of this report appears on WSJ.com.

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