Turkey rounds up 6000 suspects after failed coup

Surrey woman Lesley Adams who took to social media to reveal she had just booked flights to Turkey when the coup began last night

Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag was cited as saying that more arrests were expected on top of the 6,000 people already detained.

Erdogan's survival has turned him into a "sort of a mythical figure" and could further erode democracy in Turkey, said Soner Cagaptay, director of the Turkish research program at The Washington Institute.

Yet he has also raised the possibility that Turkey would reinstate the death penalty, which it had abolished as a part of its pursuit to join the European Union.

"Paradoxically, quenching the military putsch may not denote a triumph of democracy but rather the strengthening of authoritarian tendencies in Turkey", Witold Jurasz, head of the Center for Strategic Analysis, says. The government has also dismissed almost 3,000 judges and prosecutors from their posts, while investigators were preparing court cases to send the conspirators to trial on charges of attempting to overthrow the government.

Meanwhile, Turkey's state-run news agency says seven prosecutors, charged with investigating a foiled coup, have entered a base in southern Turkey that is key to the U.S.-led campaign against the Islamic State group.

A Turkish foreign ministry spokesman said more than 290 people, including over 100 rebels, had been killed and more than 1,400 injured following Friday's events.

But if Erdogan responds to the coup by completely abandoning Turkey's democratic principles he will be planting the seed for the next coup.

Turkish authorities have intensified arresting soldiers and judges following the coup, which Erdogan accused his former ally Fethullah Gulen of scheming.

Pentagon Press Secretary Peter Cook says "U.S. facilities at Incirlik are still operating on internal power sources, but we hope to restore commercial power soon".

Hasan Goclu, a protest organizer from DE, told Turkey's Andalou news agency of the extradition demand that "There needs to come about an agreement between the USA government and the Turkish government on this". "The clean-up operations are continuing", he said. Sunday marked a day of funerals for some of the victims and arrests of scores of alleged coup supporters within the military and judiciary.

Erdogan, who has ruled Turkey as either prime minister or president since 2003, has won several elections, most recently in 2014.

The airport, the scene of a terror attack just last month that left more than 40 dead, was closed in the early hours of the coup attempt. While Mr. Erdogan has fended off a coup, the most urgent question is this: Has he emerged even more powerful, or is he now a weakened leader who must accommodate his opponents?

"The latest coup attempt is different because it actually highlighted how the chain of command has broken down", he said.

On Sunday, Yildirim said the coup had failed and life had returned to normal, but he and other officials also urged people to take to streets at night, saying risks remained.

It also shattered fragile confidence among Turkey's allies about security in the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation country, a leading member of the US-led coalition against Islamic State.

"We would be disappointed if our (American) friends told us to present proof even though members of the assassin organization are trying to destroy an elected government under the directions of that person", Yildirim said.

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